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It's time to talk about mental health

We’ve been putting more and more focus on mental health as it is such an important issue, especially in our industry where 1 in 3 of us will experience a mental health issue in a given year. This has led to the launch of our Mental Health First Aiders – 8 people from across the business who are here for all of us to provide support when we need it, but also to champion wellbeing within the business. They are trying to break the taboo, start the conversation about mental health and make RPM an environment where everyone feels they can talk about mental health and get support when they need it.

 

 

As this Tuesday was World Mental Health Day we celebrated in a couple of different ways. Firstly, we were very lucky to have Charlie Cannon come in and deliver a session on boosting your mental health. A really informative session that gave us some great tips to help us with our mental health.

 

 

While most of us were learning from Charlie, others were at The Drum’s Do It Day – a day that brings together people from across the industry to work on briefs from charities. This year the theme was destigmatizing mental health – giving us the chance to work on a huge variety of different briefs from some great organisations. You can read about the experiences and ideas of the RPMers who attended below, and look out for the 3 winning campaigns launching in November!

 

Phil:

Oh baby! Our team had to challenge the stigma and deal with the unspoken pressures facing 16-25 year old mums, as part of a brief to support Best Beginnings and their Baby Buddy app.  

Our idea: The Secret Life of Mums. We take a tongue-in-cheek look at the realities of being a mum – letting young people know it’s not as glamorous as a Kim Kardashian photo shoot.

We use this Secret Life of Mum platform to talk about all the things that are left out of people’s conversations and expectations about motherhood. We poke fun at some of the lighter, more fun ones – but we also use it to help women have more serious conversations like, ‘Why don’t I feel attached to my baby?’

It was a tough brief to get through, but luckily our team pulled together and the client loved it! (All thanks to my mansplaining the trials and tribulations of pregnancy and motherhood)

 

Imogen:

Do It Day was a hugely inspiring day, it was great to get to work with talented people from across the industry on briefs that can make a real difference. My team was working on a brief from Young Minds which was all about helping parents to support their children through the often difficult transition from primary to secondary school. Over half of all enduring mental health issues begin before the age of 14, so they needed to get parents engaged and make sure they were supporting their children. Parents sometimes take a step back from their children at this point, as it is often the moment they think their children need to have more independence, however this loss of connection can make it really difficult when times get tough.

Our idea was a campaign to get parents to #take15 every week to spend time with the child. To put down the screens and devote time to talk to their child while doing something fun. Whether that’s a kickabout, some arts and crafts or even in the car on the way to dropping them off at school, we want parents to take that time to have fun and make the most of that time to chat. This commitment will help prevent the loss of connection and dialogue between parent and child, as well as building parent’s confidence when it comes to having difficult conversations. Then when there are difficult times, the parents will be there and the dialogue will be open helping the child to get the support they need.

After a competitive pitch with three very different ideas, we came out victorious so look out for #take15 launching November.

 

 

Lewis:

I was part of a team working on a brief for CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably).

It was genuinely a really inspiring day where I had the opportunity to work with 6 really talented people from all from different areas of the industry, working on a brief for a fantastic client.

In a nutshell, our job was to get 25-35-year-old males to open up more about their feelings and also notice when a friend may be trying to open up to them.

We came up with the idea, ‘Don’t Cockblock Your Feelings.’ A campaign that speaks directly to men to let them know that just because you’re a man, you can still be in touch and talk about your feelings, as well as being more sensitive and aware of when a friend is trying to open up to you.

We went big, we went bold, and unfortunately, we went home.

But I leave with no regrets, and genuinely believe that it could be fantastic campaign, and I would happily do it all over again!

JD:

After a brisk walk from the tube station I arrived at Imagination’s offices, our hosts for the day. I entered the main room where the event was being held and greeted one of my team members a very pleasant chap called Grant who works in the gaming industry we chattered to each other over a couple of tasty pastries and a cup of coffee, one by one the other members of the team arrived.

After we had been introduced to the day we had a quick unsuccessful conference call with Singapore and then a session on creativity which I found really enjoyable, we then met our chosen charities and our creative director for the day and had the chance to ask a few questions about the brief. Following on from this we split off into smaller sections within our team and tried one of the activities within the booklet on what success is and what this would mean for the brief.

We all agreed on what we thought success would mean for us - reaching our target of 500 participants and raising awareness about our charity. From then a plan started to emerge and we spent the remainder of the morning talking through our ideas of how to implement this. 

Quick stop for a working lunch of things I didn’t recognise and then back to it! We talked and talked and talked for hours about the endless possibilities of what we could achieve and then realised we hadn’t actually done any work that was relevant to the brief so we strapped on our thinking berets and really drilled down into what would be achievable given limited to no budget and time and came up with a pretty good idea #Letstalk. 

Our idea is to get influencers in the industry to record short videos sharing their experiences around mental health, they will kick this off by ripping some duct tape from their faces and then sharing a small story on mental health. This will be shared via LinkedIn with a link to the survey at the base of the page and shared with the #. The idea being that this generates steam like the ice bucket challenge with each person ripping off some duct tape saying #Letstalk and nominating a colleague to fill in the survey.  

We ended up winning our pitch much to the surprise of the group! We have since met NABS and Mind and started work on our campaign, time is ticking as it’s such a worthwhile cause so me and the rest of the gang are happy to throw hours at this to get us over the line and done.

 

 

A great day that will hopefully make a difference by helping to destigmatize mental health.